Freemasonry in the 21st Century

Our fraternity is ancient and honorable. We have documentation proving we’ve been in North America since 1733. The Grand Lodge of England was established in 1717. Rumor has it that Freemasonry goes back several centuries before that and our rituals tell us our fraternity was founded when the Temple of Solomon was built.

If you browse the library at Grand Lodge, you’ll find literature older than the country you’re residing in. Some of our more established lodges have regalia, books, and artifacts that have survived the lapse of time, the ruthless hands of ignorance, and the devastations of war. Masons are proud of this, and rightly so.

Masonry in Modern Society

Our past has been preserved and our tenets have persevered, but what about our future? The 21st Century is a very different time than the 18th, 19th, and 20th were. People communicate through text messages and tweets, shop online, and search for their desires on Facebook and Instagram. How do we adapt to that?

At Saint Paul Lodge in Gardner, we have a Colonial Masons Guild to preserve our history. Ironically, we’re using modern social media and email marketing to build CMG membership and send out communications and newsletters. The strategy is so effective that I decided to share it with my brothers in other lodges.

The program is titled Hiram’s Edge. Starting in September of 2017, it will be available in an online classroom setting and via email for those unable to attend in person. I designed it for Masters and Wardens, but all Master Masons are welcome.

Let’s Start a Discussion …

This space (my blog) will be used to keep you updated on what’s going on with Hiram’s Edge and also as a venue for open discussion. I want to know what you think, any suggestions you might have, and if you have similar Masonic Education projects in your lodge. Use the comment section below to give us your input.

Fraternal Regards,

Wor. Kevin D. Flynn
LOI Director of Content Creation
Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts
Hiram’s Edge Masonic Education
Kevin@HiramsEdge.com

4 thoughts on “Freemasonry in the 21st Century

  1. In the old days, there was no social media and internet. How can we tyle a digital “temple”? Besides that challenge, every “secret” is out there on youtube and web pages. The good thing about this is that we attract more people that will fit in. However a profane will not be the same profane since the late 9ties. They now come in the “50 shades of Grey”. Some educated themselves that well that they are in the twilight others absorbed all the corrupted info ou there. Young people want to know what the gain is and how much time they have to spend, what it will cost. They, generally speaking, don’t like wearing suits and ties or morning trousers and the formal toasting. I enjoy this all, born 1964 but I’m a minority. The new candidates like the esoteric and the occult and are looking for more light. You see I have been looking for more light since decades, spending my money on books and absorbing every droplet from the source, hunting for secrets and knowledge. And at some point I considered myself living like a Mason without a lodge. The more knowledge I absorbed the fewer people there were out there to discuss or talk to. By joining a lodge you find yourself surrounded by people who do understand you and are alike. This makes me feel happy and I like to socialize and take part in the social events. That’s a gain. However, social media, facebook groups, for example, is quick growing and there are virtual “lodges” forming. Ppl. don’t need to pay dues, don’t need to go to the lodge and don’t need to dress up. But who”s tylering, who is the Master and who is a member? Is there a need for a digital certificate to proof we are masons? Wat about the jurisdiction? Who is the grand lodge Facebook? What about al the side degrees and grand lodges that don’t recognize each other. Who is monitoring what you write? All these things are changing freemasonry. The good thing is, people will find and learn about us and Freemasonry in general on the internet and those people are probably made out of the right stuff, a good chance they will be the candidates that fit in and will. However, we should be aware that they are all either well informed or corrupted but all searching for more light and we are the preservers of the old source, so let them sip and you will see they will come back for more because they are thirsty.

  2. Great input, Brother Bosma. Hiram’s Edge was created to teach Masons how to better communicate online and through social media. That “virtual space” is a big part of the world we live in, and many brothers are not consciously aware when they post that they represent our fraternity and the tenets and values we stand for. This needs to be communicated in our messaging to the general public, as well as to our own brethren. As a Worshipful Master I make it a point to point out a brother’s responsibilities in that area, and remind the brethren and officers under my watch that Masonry needs to be practiced in all areas of their lives, including their “virtual” lives. This is the only way to obtain further light. Hiram’s Edge has a “compliance” component interwoven into all of our modules. It’s based on Grand Lodge of Massachusetts guidelines, but we have many brothers, like yourself, who will be receiving our recorded modules via email. We’d love to hear your input on it and how it is similar or different from what you have been taught in England and Germany.

  3. Thanks for the kind response. You wrote: “when they post that they represent our fraternity and the tenets and values we stand for.” You are absolutely right here and I’m happy to see most brethren are very aware of the (unintended) harm they can cause. Thanks for adding me to the distribution list. I’m not in a position to speak on behave of Freemasonry in my own country, the UK or Germany as you probably will understand. However on personal title speaking, I’m convinced that there is a common interest in social media for Freemasonry in general and I’m sure we all will benefit as long as we respect the obligation(s) we took. Everything out there on the internet brought me in at last and I only regret I didn’t dare to take this first step earlier in my life.

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